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Monitoring > The Sensor Project

 

What is the Sensor Project?

We have pioneered the use of oxygen saturation as a tool for identifying women and children at risk of life threatening complications of diseases such as pre-eclampsia and pneumonia.

Early identification of health risks by combining the oxygen saturation sensor and other sensors and integrating this information into smart mobile applications will help save lives. It will enable community healthcare workers to recommend interventions and individuals at home to seek healthcare, before complications arise.

Many hospitals around the world do not have any sensors – even for use during anesthesia. We wish to make our sensors available in hospitals and clinics – especially in resource poor and remote areas where these devices have not been available.

Current Status

Thanks to the generosity of donors, we were able to raise $37,000 during our inaugural campaign to equip community health workers in Mozambique and Pakistan participating in the Community Level Interventions for Pre-eclampsia (CLIP) Trials.

The opportunities provided by our funders have empowered rural health workers in our CLIP study sites in Africa and Asia to use oxygen saturation as a tool to diagnose high-risk pregnancies and refer pregnant women to higher care, thus averting deaths and illness for mothers and babies.

Snapshot of deployment: 

  • 2 countries where the pulse oximetry sensor is now used: Pakistan and Mozambique
  • 641 community health workers trained
  • 16,346 pregnant women involved in the CLIP trial intervention
  • 14,801 complete antental assessments supported
  • 668 emergency referrals of pregnant women to a nearby health facility

This initial project demonstrates that the sensors and mobile health tools we have designed are easy to use and learn. The health workers we trained reported feeling empowered to care for the pregnant women in their community. They were more confident in their knowledge of pregnancy and it’s complications and felt more respected in their role within the health system when engaging with the doctors and nurses at the health facilities.

But we have much more work to do:

  • Many hospitals around the world do not have access to oximeters – even for use during anesthesia.
  • We wish to make our sensors available in hospitals and clinics – especially in resource poor and remote areas where these devices have not been available.
  • Oximetry, alongside smart mobile health applications, can quickly detect the deterioration of patients from other conditions that are significant causes of death, such as pneumonia and sepsis, in both pediatric and adult patients.

We are continuing to develop new vital signs sensor technologies and mobile health applications, to address the challenges of providing equitable health care in low resource settings.

We wish to get these sensors and apps to women and children everywhere. Each $100 donated to The Sensor Project will purchase the development, deployment and user training of one sensor. For more information on the Sensor Project or to donate, please visit http://www.thesensorproject.org